Emily Shur Dares You Not To Love Ernie
Los Angeles-based photographer Emily Shur recently gave me a promo highlighting her fashion and portraiture. It’s a cleanly designed and nicely printed piece, on good, uncoated paper stock, that folds out into a small poster.
She put several examples of her work on one side, and a single larger image on the other. The large image, of a model in a sparkly red Peter Pilotto dress and Laura Kranitz fascinator holding a shih tzu, is from “Dog Days,” a fashion story Shur did for Paper Magazine. “That was a shoot I was really happy with and proud of, and showed a different side of my work than what people were used to seeing,” Shur says of the image choice. “I’ve been shooting more fashion lately and have really been enjoying it. I also love shooting animals, so I thought maybe this promo would help get me some different types of shoots.”"I also think when sending out a promo it’s nice to show an image that people might want to hang onto or put on their office wall—something that makes them smile," Shur adds. "I mean, if you don’t love Ernie (the dog in the photo) you’re dead inside." Fortunately I do love Ernie. And this promo. Which is indeed now on my wall.—Conor Risch Emily Shur Dares You Not To Love Ernie
Los Angeles-based photographer Emily Shur recently gave me a promo highlighting her fashion and portraiture. It’s a cleanly designed and nicely printed piece, on good, uncoated paper stock, that folds out into a small poster.
She put several examples of her work on one side, and a single larger image on the other. The large image, of a model in a sparkly red Peter Pilotto dress and Laura Kranitz fascinator holding a shih tzu, is from “Dog Days,” a fashion story Shur did for Paper Magazine. “That was a shoot I was really happy with and proud of, and showed a different side of my work than what people were used to seeing,” Shur says of the image choice. “I’ve been shooting more fashion lately and have really been enjoying it. I also love shooting animals, so I thought maybe this promo would help get me some different types of shoots.”"I also think when sending out a promo it’s nice to show an image that people might want to hang onto or put on their office wall—something that makes them smile," Shur adds. "I mean, if you don’t love Ernie (the dog in the photo) you’re dead inside." Fortunately I do love Ernie. And this promo. Which is indeed now on my wall.—Conor Risch

Emily Shur Dares You Not To Love Ernie

Los Angeles-based photographer Emily Shur recently gave me a promo highlighting her fashion and portraiture. It’s a cleanly designed and nicely printed piece, on good, uncoated paper stock, that folds out into a small poster.

She put several examples of her work on one side, and a single larger image on the other. The large image, of a model in a sparkly red Peter Pilotto dress and Laura Kranitz fascinator holding a shih tzu, is from “Dog Days,” a fashion story Shur did for Paper Magazine. “That was a shoot I was really happy with and proud of, and showed a different side of my work than what people were used to seeing,” Shur says of the image choice. “I’ve been shooting more fashion lately and have really been enjoying it. I also love shooting animals, so I thought maybe this promo would help get me some different types of shoots.”

"I also think when sending out a promo it’s nice to show an image that people might want to hang onto or put on their office wall—something that makes them smile," Shur adds. "I mean, if you don’t love Ernie (the dog in the photo) you’re dead inside." Fortunately I do love Ernie. And this promo. Which is indeed now on my wall.

—Conor Risch

Matthew Salacuse’s Sticker HeadsPDN photo editor Amy Wolff brought Matthew Salacuse's newish sticker promo over to me this morning. One can pull off each of the people pictured on the promo and stick them to things. With promos people are always talking “top of mind.” This promo encourages people to stick up little reminders of Salacuse’s work. He reports that most people have stuck heads on their phones. But, he says, “one art buyer told me that she had the Rick Ross sticker protecting her hard drive as some misguided idea of a firewall.”"What I like about the stickers themselves is that they are not branded," Salacuse explains. "The recipient has the freedom to put the stickers where they like without having to be bombarded with logos. But the upshot is that whenever they look at them, they are still thinking of Salacuse!"The advertising and editorial photographer evidently has a history of using stickers as promos, along with other creative efforts that have included t-shirts, posters and even a wall mural.I was going to stick Nas on something but Amy’s insisting on keeping the promo intact.—Conor Risch

Matthew Salacuse’s Sticker Heads

PDN photo editor Amy Wolff brought Matthew Salacuse's newish sticker promo over to me this morning. One can pull off each of the people pictured on the promo and stick them to things. With promos people are always talking “top of mind.” This promo encourages people to stick up little reminders of Salacuse’s work. He reports that most people have stuck heads on their phones. But, he says, “one art buyer told me that she had the Rick Ross sticker protecting her hard drive as some misguided idea of a firewall.”

"What I like about the stickers themselves is that they are not branded," Salacuse explains. "The recipient has the freedom to put the stickers where they like without having to be bombarded with logos. But the upshot is that whenever they look at them, they are still thinking of Salacuse!"

The advertising and editorial photographer evidently has a history of using stickers as promos, along with other creative efforts that have included t-shirts, posters and even a wall mural.

I was going to stick Nas on something but Amy’s insisting on keeping the promo intact.

—Conor Risch

Adam Ewing’s Hand-Crafted “Lincoln” PromoGarden & Gun Photography Director Maggie Brett Kennedy sent me Adam Ewing’s “Lincoln” promo a couple of weeks ago. The hand-made quality of the promo and attention to detail convinced Kennedy that the promo was “definitely a keeper,” she says. “Every aspect of Adam’s promo stood out as soon as it arrived in the mail.”Ewing, a Richmond, Virginia editorial and advertising photographer, made the promo from a personal portraiture project he created with his friend Anya Mills, an art producer at The Martin Agency. The project depicts the actors and extras from Richmond who were cast in Steven Spielberg’s film “Lincoln,” which was shot in the area. The color portraits show the actors in modern-day clothes with 19th century hairstyles, and the images were digitally processed and printed to reference the wet plate collodion portraits of the era, even though they’re in color. “I liked the idea of respectfully nodding to this style of photography, but it was definitely not my intention to fool anyone into thinking that that was how they were created.” Ewing tells PDN via email. “My goal was only to blend the past with the present.”“I felt this side/personal project was something I wanted to share with clients,” Ewing explains. “I do a lot of portraiture and automotive/motorcycle work, and want to show my range.” The loose prints in the promo are wrapped in parchment and bound with twine, and slipped into a clear plastic envelope with a brown-paper address label. The address is handwritten in an old style. And the stamps even commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. “My producer Cindy Hicks (who was an art producer for 16 years), really impressed upon me which mailers caught her attention over the years, and she put the entire package together,” Ewing notes. The promos are all numbered as well.—Conor Risch

Adam Ewing’s Hand-Crafted “Lincoln” Promo

Garden & Gun Photography Director Maggie Brett Kennedy sent me Adam Ewing’s “Lincoln” promo a couple of weeks ago. The hand-made quality of the promo and attention to detail convinced Kennedy that the promo was “definitely a keeper,” she says. “Every aspect of Adam’s promo stood out as soon as it arrived in the mail.”

Ewing, a Richmond, Virginia editorial and advertising photographer, made the promo from a personal portraiture project he created with his friend Anya Mills, an art producer at The Martin Agency. The project depicts the actors and extras from Richmond who were cast in Steven Spielberg’s film “Lincoln,” which was shot in the area.

The color portraits show the actors in modern-day clothes with 19th century hairstyles, and the images were digitally processed and printed to reference the wet plate collodion portraits of the era, even though they’re in color. “I liked the idea of respectfully nodding to this style of photography, but it was definitely not my intention to fool anyone into thinking that that was how they were created.” Ewing tells PDN via email. “My goal was only to blend the past with the present.”

“I felt this side/personal project was something I wanted to share with clients,” Ewing explains. “I do a lot of portraiture and automotive/motorcycle work, and want to show my range.” The loose prints in the promo are wrapped in parchment and bound with twine, and slipped into a clear plastic envelope with a brown-paper address label. The address is handwritten in an old style. And the stamps even commemorate the Emancipation Proclamation. “My producer Cindy Hicks (who was an art producer for 16 years), really impressed upon me which mailers caught her attention over the years, and she put the entire package together,” Ewing notes. The promos are all numbered as well.

—Conor Risch

Blaise Hayward put his environmental portraits of small business owners into a great promo recently. The images of hardware and clothing store owners, fishermen, bar owners, beekeepers and more, are very engaging. Hayward also includes a short paragraph about their businesses. He presents the work in a 5x7-inch perfect bound book, printed on Neenah uncoated paper, with a silver-foil-stamped cover. The last spread includes Hayward’s own story, which ties his own life and work into the presentation. “I have worked for myself since I got out of school, so in a sense I too am a small business,” Hayward told us via email. “I was able to really relate to these people in a way that enabled the pictures to be honest. The subjects were themselves, no styling, no hair and make-up, no pretense.” Hayward reports that the promo has helped secure two ad jobs shooting small business owners. To have a closer look download a PDF here.—Conor Risch Blaise Hayward put his environmental portraits of small business owners into a great promo recently. The images of hardware and clothing store owners, fishermen, bar owners, beekeepers and more, are very engaging. Hayward also includes a short paragraph about their businesses. He presents the work in a 5x7-inch perfect bound book, printed on Neenah uncoated paper, with a silver-foil-stamped cover. The last spread includes Hayward’s own story, which ties his own life and work into the presentation. “I have worked for myself since I got out of school, so in a sense I too am a small business,” Hayward told us via email. “I was able to really relate to these people in a way that enabled the pictures to be honest. The subjects were themselves, no styling, no hair and make-up, no pretense.” Hayward reports that the promo has helped secure two ad jobs shooting small business owners. To have a closer look download a PDF here.—Conor Risch Blaise Hayward put his environmental portraits of small business owners into a great promo recently. The images of hardware and clothing store owners, fishermen, bar owners, beekeepers and more, are very engaging. Hayward also includes a short paragraph about their businesses. He presents the work in a 5x7-inch perfect bound book, printed on Neenah uncoated paper, with a silver-foil-stamped cover. The last spread includes Hayward’s own story, which ties his own life and work into the presentation. “I have worked for myself since I got out of school, so in a sense I too am a small business,” Hayward told us via email. “I was able to really relate to these people in a way that enabled the pictures to be honest. The subjects were themselves, no styling, no hair and make-up, no pretense.” Hayward reports that the promo has helped secure two ad jobs shooting small business owners. To have a closer look download a PDF here.—Conor Risch Blaise Hayward put his environmental portraits of small business owners into a great promo recently. The images of hardware and clothing store owners, fishermen, bar owners, beekeepers and more, are very engaging. Hayward also includes a short paragraph about their businesses. He presents the work in a 5x7-inch perfect bound book, printed on Neenah uncoated paper, with a silver-foil-stamped cover. The last spread includes Hayward’s own story, which ties his own life and work into the presentation. “I have worked for myself since I got out of school, so in a sense I too am a small business,” Hayward told us via email. “I was able to really relate to these people in a way that enabled the pictures to be honest. The subjects were themselves, no styling, no hair and make-up, no pretense.” Hayward reports that the promo has helped secure two ad jobs shooting small business owners. To have a closer look download a PDF here.—Conor Risch

Blaise Hayward put his environmental portraits of small business owners into a great promo recently. The images of hardware and clothing store owners, fishermen, bar owners, beekeepers and more, are very engaging. Hayward also includes a short paragraph about their businesses. He presents the work in a 5x7-inch perfect bound book, printed on Neenah uncoated paper, with a silver-foil-stamped cover. The last spread includes Hayward’s own story, which ties his own life and work into the presentation. “I have worked for myself since I got out of school, so in a sense I too am a small business,” Hayward told us via email. “I was able to really relate to these people in a way that enabled the pictures to be honest. The subjects were themselves, no styling, no hair and make-up, no pretense.” Hayward reports that the promo has helped secure two ad jobs shooting small business owners. To have a closer look download a PDF here.

—Conor Risch

This promo I received from photographer David Tsay a couple of weeks ago is impressive (Tsay’s stop-motion video showing off the piece is above). It comes in a stitched envelope that’s made from what appears to be a recycled proof sheet. Within that envelope are several pieces of different sizes, which show all the various subjects Tsay photographs, from fashion and portraits to kids to food to architecture and interiors. The whole package has a handmade feel. I already noted the stitched envelope. In addition there’s a paper bag that houses one printed piece, which is hand-stamped with Chinese characters, and there’s also a reproduction of one of Tsay’s notebook pages that shows his sketches on one side and has a handwritten note from Tsay on the other.

Back in our December 2011 issue we wrote an article about the different ways photographers are working on their branding (if you’re a PDN subscriber you can login to read that article here.) Tsay talked about how he was working to show clients that although he shoots many different types of images, he maintains a cohesive esthetic. When he began working with his rep Kate Ryan, Tsay told PDN, “My work was evolving into different areas and we didn’t know how to tie it all together to make a cohesive presentation.” I can’t help but think back to that conversation when I look at this promo. In it we see all that Tsay does in one package, and it all fits together beautifully.


—Conor Risch

One of my favorite promos of last year was from Denver-based photographer Matt Nager. He came in to the PDN offices today to say hello, and when he pulled out his book, I remembered the promo immediately because he had the same designer create both the stamped and cloth-covered portfolio/slipcase, and the little box that his Weavers promo came in. It also reminded me that Matt created a nice little video to show off his promo.

—Conor Risch

Brooklyn-based lifestyle/fashion photographer Anna Wolf sent me a little gem of a promo a few weeks ago. Measuring a mere 4.25 x 6.25 inches, this well designed booklet is printed on an uncoated stock, stitched with thread and comes wrapped in a belly band. It’s smart and sexy, one that I’ll keep. 
To see Anna’s larger format mailer, check out Newsprint Promos That Work on www.pdnonline.com.
—Darren Ching
Brooklyn-based lifestyle/fashion photographer Anna Wolf sent me a little gem of a promo a few weeks ago. Measuring a mere 4.25 x 6.25 inches, this well designed booklet is printed on an uncoated stock, stitched with thread and comes wrapped in a belly band. It’s smart and sexy, one that I’ll keep. 
To see Anna’s larger format mailer, check out Newsprint Promos That Work on www.pdnonline.com.
—Darren Ching

Brooklyn-based lifestyle/fashion photographer Anna Wolf sent me a little gem of a promo a few weeks ago. Measuring a mere 4.25 x 6.25 inches, this well designed booklet is printed on an uncoated stock, stitched with thread and comes wrapped in a belly band. It’s smart and sexy, one that I’ll keep. 

To see Anna’s larger format mailer, check out Newsprint Promos That Work on www.pdnonline.com.

—Darren Ching