Emily Shur Dares You Not To Love Ernie
Los Angeles-based photographer Emily Shur recently gave me a promo highlighting her fashion and portraiture. It’s a cleanly designed and nicely printed piece, on good, uncoated paper stock, that folds out into a small poster.
She put several examples of her work on one side, and a single larger image on the other. The large image, of a model in a sparkly red Peter Pilotto dress and Laura Kranitz fascinator holding a shih tzu, is from “Dog Days,” a fashion story Shur did for Paper Magazine. “That was a shoot I was really happy with and proud of, and showed a different side of my work than what people were used to seeing,” Shur says of the image choice. “I’ve been shooting more fashion lately and have really been enjoying it. I also love shooting animals, so I thought maybe this promo would help get me some different types of shoots.”"I also think when sending out a promo it’s nice to show an image that people might want to hang onto or put on their office wall—something that makes them smile," Shur adds. "I mean, if you don’t love Ernie (the dog in the photo) you’re dead inside." Fortunately I do love Ernie. And this promo. Which is indeed now on my wall.—Conor Risch Emily Shur Dares You Not To Love Ernie
Los Angeles-based photographer Emily Shur recently gave me a promo highlighting her fashion and portraiture. It’s a cleanly designed and nicely printed piece, on good, uncoated paper stock, that folds out into a small poster.
She put several examples of her work on one side, and a single larger image on the other. The large image, of a model in a sparkly red Peter Pilotto dress and Laura Kranitz fascinator holding a shih tzu, is from “Dog Days,” a fashion story Shur did for Paper Magazine. “That was a shoot I was really happy with and proud of, and showed a different side of my work than what people were used to seeing,” Shur says of the image choice. “I’ve been shooting more fashion lately and have really been enjoying it. I also love shooting animals, so I thought maybe this promo would help get me some different types of shoots.”"I also think when sending out a promo it’s nice to show an image that people might want to hang onto or put on their office wall—something that makes them smile," Shur adds. "I mean, if you don’t love Ernie (the dog in the photo) you’re dead inside." Fortunately I do love Ernie. And this promo. Which is indeed now on my wall.—Conor Risch

Emily Shur Dares You Not To Love Ernie

Los Angeles-based photographer Emily Shur recently gave me a promo highlighting her fashion and portraiture. It’s a cleanly designed and nicely printed piece, on good, uncoated paper stock, that folds out into a small poster.

She put several examples of her work on one side, and a single larger image on the other. The large image, of a model in a sparkly red Peter Pilotto dress and Laura Kranitz fascinator holding a shih tzu, is from “Dog Days,” a fashion story Shur did for Paper Magazine. “That was a shoot I was really happy with and proud of, and showed a different side of my work than what people were used to seeing,” Shur says of the image choice. “I’ve been shooting more fashion lately and have really been enjoying it. I also love shooting animals, so I thought maybe this promo would help get me some different types of shoots.”

"I also think when sending out a promo it’s nice to show an image that people might want to hang onto or put on their office wall—something that makes them smile," Shur adds. "I mean, if you don’t love Ernie (the dog in the photo) you’re dead inside." Fortunately I do love Ernie. And this promo. Which is indeed now on my wall.

—Conor Risch

This promo postcard for Gregory Halpern’s book A, published by J&L, included one of my favorite images from the book. Halpern spoke with PDN about his look at several rust-belt communities in the United States for the October 2011 issue.
—Conor Risch

This promo postcard for Gregory Halpern’s book A, published by J&L, included one of my favorite images from the book. Halpern spoke with PDN about his look at several rust-belt communities in the United States for the October 2011 issue.

—Conor Risch